Saint George Orthodox Christian Church
Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese
1505 Avenue G Kearney, Nebraska
Prayers

Lex orandi, lex credendi.

The law of prayer, the law of belief.

The way we worship, the way we believe.

Lex orandi, lex credendi. This Latin phrase presents one of the great principles of the ancient Christian Faith - that what we believe and how we pray and worship are intimately connected. The Orthodox Christian Church has held fast to this great truth in every generation. For us, doctrine cannot exist separately from prayer or spirituality; change in the nature or form of worship inevitably leads to a change in what we believe and how we live.

Far from being separate and independent categories, doctrine, spirituality, morality, prayer and worship form a single whole that might best be called The Way. This earliest description of the Christian Faith points to the all-encompassing way of life that the Apostolic Church knew to be "the new life in Christ."

Thus, in the Orthodox Faith, theology is not an academic, philosophical discipline to be learned through reading or study. Such an approach inevitably leads to speculation and conjecture. Rather, a true theologian is one who truly prays - one whose nous (or heart, as it is described in Holy Scripture) has been purified by divine grace - and has been blessed to "see God," an experience identical to that of Peter, James and John on Mount Tabor.

The best way to learn theology is to pray. And the best way to learn more about Orthodox Christianity is to see her in prayer. The following written prayers, some of which have been handed down from the Apostolic Era, are a few representatives of what, and how, Orthodoxy believes.

Trisagion Prayers | Psalm 50 | Prayer to our Lord Jesus Christ | St. Symeon's Prayer | Prayer at Daybreak | Prayer of Manasseh | Prayers before Communion | Prayers after Communion | The Jesus Prayer | The Prayer of St. Epraim the Syrian